COUNT'S TAVERN

Counts.jpg
Counts.jpg

COUNT'S TAVERN

900.00

This image is a limited edition offering of 36 prints and 3 artists proofs on sekishu torinoko gampi. Once the edition sells out, there will be no more palladium prints for sale. The artist proofs are not for sale. Each print comes ready to frame mounted inside a 15”x26” off white museum mat.

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COUNT’S TAVERN - WARREN, PENNSYLVANIA - 2010

Count's Tavern is the kind of place that makes the local police blotter worth reading. I had arrived on the outskirts of Warren during a typical summer late afternoon storm. The day was long, so I decided to camp out a few miles away from the tavern. That night I went for a walk around the downtown area. Every street was packed elbow to elbow. Turns out there was a very large hillbilly hoedown going on. This could be a good thing a I had missed lunch and was hungry down to the bone. The smell of food was overwhelming. I stopped at the first tent that smelled the best. They were serving a big bun full of steamy meat. I darn near ripped that sandwich apart as I fed my face. The taste was rather odd, yet different. I decided to ask what type of meat was used. To this day I shall never forget the answer. That was the moment I was introduced to possum pie on a slab of bread. The damage was done so I walked around and took in some music.

The hour was getting late as I took a stroll past Count’s Tavern. The simple act of walking past the front door of the tavern brought back some interesting memories from my military days. I was a few seconds away from crossing the threshold into the saloon when two hillbillies came flying out the door on the way to the ground. Then came the crowd. Yet another liquor induced fight. Time to head back to the solitude of my motel room.

The following morning the sky was still full of angry clouds. I set the camera up at the base of the mural and waited for some sun. The clouds opened up a few hours later as I managed to pop the shutter. Lady luck helped out as I reversed my film holder and snagged a backup negative. I was back on the road long before the locals had awoke from the previous nights liquor fueled festivities. I shot this image with an 8x20 view camera on Bergger 200 sheet film.